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Budget Information Archive

 

  

  

Budget Information 2017-2018

  

Budget Presentations 2017-2018

 


 

Budget Information 2016-2017

  

Budget Presentations 2016-2017

 


Budget Information 2015-2016

   

Budget Presentations 2015-2016

 


Budget Information 2014-2015

 

Budget Presentations 2014-2015

 


Budget Information 2013-2014

  

Budget Presentations 2013-2014

 


Budget Information 2012-2013

 

Additional Documents

 

Budget Presentations 2012-2013

 


Budget Information 2011-2012

 

Budget Presentations 2011-2012

 

Q and A

IN THE PROPOSED BUDGET, ARE THERE ANY CUTS TO PROGRAMS OR STAFF?
There are no proposed cuts to programs or staff.

 
WHAT HAPPENS IF THE BUDGET DOESN’T PASS?
If the voters reject the proposed budget on May 17th, the Board of Education may (1) choose to offer the same or a revised budget to the voters for a revote on June 21st, or (2) immediately adopt a contingency budget.  If the second budget is defeated, the Board of Education must adopt a contingency budget before July 1st.

 

WHAT HAPPENS IF THE DISTRICT MUST ADOPT A CONTINGENCY BUDGET? *
If the Board of Education adopts a contingency budget, the increase in the 2011-2012  budget is subject to a 1.92% cap over the 2010-2011 adopted budget.  The contingency budget is subject to required adjustments, such as payments of outstanding bond issues.  The District’s budget will be limited to “ordinary contingent expenses.”  All equipment purchases, nonessential maintenance and capital projects are excluded.  Any programs or activities not mandated by the state may be reduced or eliminated.

 
* It is important to note that a contingency budget does not necessarily avoid a tax rate increase, as all contractual obligations must continue to be met.



WHY DOESN’T THE DISTRICT ADOPT A 0% TAX LEVY INCREASE?
If the District were to adopt a 0% tax levy increase, the proposed 2011-2012 budget would have to be reduced by $2.2 million.  A reduction of this magnitude would negatively impact student programs and activities.  If the proposed 2011-2012 budget remains at $151,178,758 and the District proposed a 0% tax levy increase, the District would be forced to use an additional $1,075,000 of reserved fund balance and an additional $1,290,000 of unreserved fund balance.  Since the District would need to replenish this fund balance for future expenses, taxpayers would most likely experience a spike in the tax rate in years to follow.



WHAT IS A FUND BALANCE?
A fund balance is created when revenues are either higher than what was budgeted and/or expenses are lower than what was budgeted.  There are two components of the fund balance:  the reserved fund balance and the unreserved fund balance.


WHY IS IT IMPORTANT THAT A DISTRICT MAINTAIN A FUND BALANCE?
Reserve funds are a sign of fiscal health and serve to protect a school district’s assets in an uncertain economic climate.  Reserve funds enable the district to appropriate money for long-term needs.  Reserves, when used prudently, can assist school districts in keeping future tax rate increases level.


WHAT IS INCLUDED IN THE RESERVED FUND BALANCE?
The reserved fund balance consists of a district’s monies for future use.  Reserve funds provide school districts with a means for legally saving money.  All reserve funds have authorized purposes and provide school districts with resources for current and future obligations.  The reserved fund balance includes:  the Employee Benefit Accrued Liability Reserve (EBALR), the Employees’ Retirement System Reserve, the Capital Reserve, the Workers’ Compensation Reserve and insurance reserves.


WHAT IS INCLUDED IN THE UNRESERVED FUND BALANCE?
The unreserved component of the fund balance is available to reduce school property taxes in the next fiscal year, as last year’s fund balance is reducing the current year’s tax levy.  School districts may retain a portion of this unreserved fund balance to meet unanticipated expenditures, such as unforeseen special education costs or revenue shortfalls.  The unreserved fund balance of the Northport-East Northport School District includes:  the Unappropriated Fund Balance (up to 4% of the following year’s budget) and the Appropriated Fund Balance (used to reduce the tax levy).


IS THE SIZE OF THE DISTRICT’S FUND BALANCE REASONABLE AND APPROPRIATE?
The amount of the fund balance should be in direct correlation to the amount of a district’s budget.  If a district does not appropriate enough monies to meet current and future obligations, it subjects the district to financial risk.  Moody’s Financial Report from August, 2010 states the following about the Northport-East Northport School District, “Having built its reserves over the past few years,…the district maintains moderate financial flexibility and [is expected] to continue to manage [its monies] effectively given timely tax levy increases and judicious expenditure controls.”


THE 2011-2012 BUDGET-TO-BUDGET INCREASE IS 2.50%. WHAT PORTION OF THAT INCREASE IS DUE TO INCREASED EMPLOYER COSTS FOR RETIREMENT AND HEALTH INSURANCE?
Approximately 1.38% of the 2.50% budget-to-budget increase is due to increased employer costs for employees' retirement (.87%), teachers' retirement (.27%) and health insurance (.24%).

WHAT IS THE ASSESSED VALUATION?
Please click here for an explanation of assessed valuation.

WHAT IS THE ASSESSED VALUATION OF MY PROPERTY?
WHAT IS THE TAX IMPACT IN THE 2011-2012 BUDGET?
HOW HAVE MY TAXES INCREASED DURING THE PAST YEARS?

Please click here for answers to these questions.

Studies on the Relationship between Quality Schools and Property Values